Join our team

crop 800 team meeting feb 27 2016 group greatLove Dog Adventures is the Nevada Community Partner Affiliate program of the national therapy organization Pet Partners. This means that all of our volunteer handlers and animals have been trained, tested and insured by Pet Partners (www.petpartners.org).

The path to becoming a Pet Partner and member of the Love Dog Adventures team begins with understanding your animal and becoming the best handler you can.

  1. Your pet must be at least one year old to be evaluated and have lived with you for at least six months.
  2. Your dog cannot walk with any metal equipment such as choke, prong or electronic collars.Your dog should be trained with positive methods. This is to insure that you understand your dog’s behavior, signs and signals.
  3. Your dog should not be on a raw protein diet.

To become a Pet Partners registered therapy team:

  • Complete the Pet Partners Handler Workshop conducted by Sue Grundfest
  • Complete the Pet Partners Health Screening for your pet
  • Pass the Pet Partner Evaluation
  • Register with Pet Partners

To become part of the Love Dog Program:

  • Attend the Love Dog Training Clinic – advanced training hours with your dog
  • Shadow the Love Dog teams without your pet
  • Once you have passed the Pet Partners Evaluation and are Registered, begin by being mentored by an experienced Love Dog therapy team
  • Volunteer at a Love Dog health / educational facility / program

The current Pet Partners Handler Workshop is full – the next available Handler Workshop will be on Sunday, October 16 – but  it is not too soon to attend a Free Orientation – If you are interested in attending the next Orientation, contact Sue at 917-301-4710 or sue@lovedogadventures.org.

Here is a simple guide to begin your journey:

Some things to consider as you begin your therapy team journey:

 Ask yourself these questions:

  • Is my pet temperamentally and behaviorally reliable?
  • Is my pet comfortable in a variety of settings?
  • Does my pet seek out new experiences with unfamiliar people?
  • Does my pet not only accept hugging and petting, but enjoy it?
  • Is my pet friendly / calm and neutral around other animals?
  • Do I feel confident in my ability to control my pet?
  • Does my pet have basic obedience and not jump or bark?
  • Am I friendly with people and comfortable in unfamiliar settings?
  • Can I raise the skill level of my pet and take the time, energy and motivation to do this?
  • Do I have the time to commit to a volunteer assignment?
  • Do I find joy in sharing my love for my pet with others?

ARTICLES:

Is animal-assisted therapy work for you? Browse through these articles and see if you should pursue becoming a Pet Partners therapy team with your dog or cat:

PREPARE FOR YOUR PP THERAPY ANIMAL EVALUATION

A LAST VISIT CAN BE JUST THE BEGINNING

HOW THERAPY DOGS HELP STROKE SURVIVORS

MANAGING A THERAPY VISUT EFFECTIVELY HOW TO JUGGLE THERAPY ASSIGNMENTS

ONE LITTLE BOY AND ONE VERY LARGE DOG NEVER FORGET WHY WE DO THIS

THE IMPORTANCE OF PLACE

THE SIMPLIEST VISIT CAN BE THE MOST POWERFUL

VERY SMALL THERAPY DOGS AND HOW THEY ARE DIFFERENT

WHAT MAKES A GREAT FACILITY PARTNER

WHAT WE LOOK FOR IN POTENTIAL LOVE DOG TEAMS

WHAT WE LOOK FOR IN THERAPY CATS

WHY THERAPY TEAM RETESTING IS SO IMPORTANT